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Do You Need a Heel Lift for Your Snowshoes?

Do You Need a Heel Lift for Your Snowshoes?

Posted by Crescent Moon on May 13th 2021

If you are looking for a fun activity that will allow you to enjoy the outdoors to the fullest during the winter, then you might have heard about snowshoeing. When you look outside of your window, and you see beautiful new-fallen snow, then you probably want to get out and jump around in it as quickly as possible. Even though you may have experienced skiing and snowboarding, you might be thinking about going snowshoeing for the first time. When you decide to go snowshoeing, you will get to enjoy the rolling hills of white powder, gorgeous trees, and the beautiful, big, blue sky. When you decide to go snowshoeing, you need to make sure that you have the right equipment. This means the right snowshoes as well. One accessory that you may require for your snowshoes is a heel lift. What is a heel lift, why you need it, and what snowshoes would you use a heel lift with?

Snowshoe Heel Lift

What Exactly Is a Heel Lift?

heel lift is precisely what it sounds like. A heel lift is designed to increase the final resting place of your heel slightly. When you take a step while wearing snowshoes and have a heel lift attached, you will feel that your heel will strike the ground slightly sooner. Think about this as you would in high heels.

Even though a heel lift is not a pointed heel, it provides you with a flat surface that will slightly increase the final resting point of your heel itself. A heel lift aims to make it slightly easier for you to walk in snowshoes on an incline.

When Is a Heel Lift Used?

Importantly, you will not always require a heel lift; however, you may benefit from a heel lift if you are planning on walking uphill. One of the hardest parts of snowshoeing is trying to walk up steep hills. If you do not have a heel lift, your calf muscles extend significantly when you take a step. As a result, you will not be able to contract your calf muscles with the same amount of force, making it harder for you to propel your body uphill.

A heel lift will increase the final resting place of your calf muscles when you walk uphill. Because your calf muscles will be in a more natural position, you will have a much easier time contracting them and walking uphill. Notably, some heel lifts are even adjustable, allowing you to detract them when you are walking on flat surfaces or tackling downhill areas.

What Snowshoes Are Good for Heel Lifts?

If you are looking for snowshoes with heel lifts, there are a few options that you must consider. One of the top choices is the aluminum snowshoes from Crescent Moon. Featured on all of the aluminum snowshoes, the heel lift adds two inches of height to your calf muscles, making it much easier for you to tackle the uphill portions of your hike. Even though the foam snowshoes are also outstanding, they do not require a heel lift because of the natural hinge they already feature. Aluminum snowshoes are strong, comfortable, and durable. Thanks to the heel lifts, they will also make it significantly easier for you to handle steep climbs. Of course, there are other accessories that you may find helpful as well.

Make Your Uphill Climb a Little Bit Easier for Crescent Moon!

In addition to a heel lift, other accessories might make it easier for you to handle steep grades. For example, you might benefit from avalanche probestrekking poles, and even a shovel that can get you out of tight spots and provide you with a little bit of added strength, making it easier for you to climb to the top of that mountain. Take a look at everything that Crescent Moon has to offer today, and get yourself ready for an outstanding winter season! There is plenty of snow out there for you to explore, so get your snowshoe gear ready, and head out!

Check out all of our foam snowshoes, aluminum snowshoes and snowshoe accessories.

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